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Quick Answer: Prose edda best translation?

What is the difference between the Prose Edda and the Poetic Edda?

The “Poetic Edda” is used to refer to a group of poems dealing with the Norse Gods and heroes. The poems themselves are unattributed and the author Codex is unknown. The Prose Edda, by contrast, is attributed to Snorri Sturluson, although he may have simply compiled it, as opposed to having been the author.

Who wrote the Prose Edda and why are there inconsistencies in it?

The ‘Prose Edda’ is traditionally associated with the real-life Icelandic scholar and chieftain, Snorri Sturluson (1179-1241). He is explicitly stated as having written the fourth section and is, by extension, often credited with the entire compilation so that it is sometimes referred to as ‘Snorri’s Edda’.

How long is the Prose Edda?

The Prose Edda: Norse Mythology (Penguin Classics)

The average reader will spend 3 hours and 0 minutes reading this book at 250 WPM (words per minute). Written in Iceland a century after the close of the Viking Age, The Prose Edda is the source of most of what we know of Norse mythology.

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How many pages is the Poetic Edda?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780292764996
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Publication date: 01/01/1962
Edition description: Revised
Pages: 376

What does Edda mean in Norwegian?

1) Old Norse edda = ‘great-grandmother’

What tree did Odin hung from?

He then hanged himself in Yggdrasil, the tree of life, for nine days and nine nights in order to gain knowledge of other worlds and be able to understand the runes.

Which Edda should I read first?

By reading the Prose Edda first, you will have the easier material “under your belt.” You can then move to the more difficult, older Poetic Edda with more background to help you digest the nuggets that are harder to comprehend.

What did the Norse call their epic poems?

The Poetic Edda is the modern name for an untitled collection of Old Norse anonymous poems, which is distinct from the Prose Edda written by Snorri Sturluson. Several versions exist, all primarily of text from the Icelandic medieval manuscript known as the Codex Regius, which contains 31 poems.

Why is Yggdrasil important?

Yggdrasil is also called the World Tree or Tree of Life because it contains all the worlds and represents the cycle of birth, growth, death, and rebirth. Yggdrasil is an important element of Norse mythology as the eternal ash that contains the nine worlds of the cosmos.

What language is the Poetic Edda written in?

The Poetic Edda, also known as Sæmundar Edda or the Elder Edda, is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic medieval manuscript Codex Regius (“Royal Book”). Along with the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda is the most expansive source on Norse mythology.

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What is Ragnarok the god of?

Ragnarok is the cataclysmic destruction of the cosmos and everything in it – even the gods. For the Vikings, the myth of Ragnarok was a prophecy of what was to come at some unspecified and unknown time in the future, but it had profound ramifications for how the Vikings understood the world in their own time.

Who wrote the Prose Edda?

The Prose Edda was written by the Icelandic chieftain, poet, and historian Snorri Sturluson, probably in 1222–23.

Is the Havamal in the Poetic Edda?

The Havamal is the collection of poetry attributed to Odin. It is included in the Poetic Edda and is a core element of Norse Mythology. The Havamal is a book of wisdom full of contraditions.

Who is Odin?

Odin was the great magician among the gods and was associated with runes. He was also the god of poets. In outward appearance he was a tall, old man, with flowing beard and only one eye (the other he gave in exchange for wisdom). He was usually depicted wearing a cloak and a wide-brimmed hat and carrying a spear.

Who wrote the Codex Regius?

Codex Regius (Latin: Cōdex Rēgius, “Royal Book” or “King’s Book”; Icelandic: Konungsbók) or GKS 2365 4º is an Icelandic codex in which many Old Norse poems are preserved.

Contents.

Völuspá (Prophecy of the Völva)
Hárbarðsljóð (Lay of Hárbarðr)
Hymiskviða (Hymir’s poem)
Lokasenna (Loki’s quarrel)
Þrymskviða (Thrym’s poem)
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